Archives for Fort Bend County History

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EVOLUTION OF A  STATE      Noha Smithwick

Chapters 1-4 [PDF]   Chapters 5-10 PDF]  Chapters 11-15 [PDF]  Chapters 16-20 [PDF]Chapters 21-26 [PDF] ______________________________________________________________________________________

THE RUNAWAY SCRAPE: THE NON-COMBATANTS IN THE TEXAS REVOLUTION BY MRS. DILUE ROSE HARRIS

The Runaway Scrape, By Mrs. Dilue Rose Harris [PDF]

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GLIMPSES OF OUR HISTORY     Mona Fenn

             Written by the wife of a descendent of an 'Original 300' [David Fitzgerald], this book details the history of two families back in time for over 200 years.  Mona's family settled on the Coffee Plantation  located in Brazoria County, Texas. The Coffee Plantation location is on FM 1462  between Oyster Creek and the Brazos River. The David Fitzgerald homestead is in Fort Bend County, Texas. [PDF]

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THE FAMILY TREE OF DANIEL PERRY, 1704-1970

Excerpt from this book pertaining to the lives of this family while living at Duke Station, Fort Bend County.These are numbers of the pages of the book, not PDF pages. Page iii of the INTRODUCTION [page 5 PDF] mentions a picture of Daniel Perry in the San Jacinto  Museum. Page 93 [page 13 PDF] mentions Robert Williams and Thomas R. Williams as Commissioners. Page 103 [page 23 PDF] makes mention of Elizabeth Fulshear Perry Page 114 [page 34 PDF] at the bottom, indicates that Hubert's belief is that Richardson Perry, who died  at the Alamo, was not born in Texas. Page 119 [page 39] mention the daughter of Churchill Fulshear, Elizabeth, marries James Perry, Daniel  Perry's brother. James and Elizabeth had a daughter Minerva Fulshear Perry. James Perry  bought land from White and Knight and was living on when Daniel Perry stayed with him in 1832. Page 120 [page 40 PDF] The marriage of Daniel Perry to Lousia [Louisiana] Morton, daughter of  William Morton was witnessed by Wylie Martin, Walter C. White, James W. Jones, R. Jones,  James Cochran, William Little and Thomas Barnett. The couple then moved to the a quarter of  the Fitzgerald League Louisa Ann Perry owned. Clear Lake then and later Duke, Texas William and Nancy Morton arrived in 1824 with 5 daughters and son John, who was 17. [daughters Louisa Ann, Mary married William Huff and Jane [was Nancy's daughter by a previous marriage and married William Little] are all I know of. Page 121 [page 41 PDF] David Fitzgerald, John Fitzgerald, Eli Fenn, Sarah Fenn, J. R. Fenn, Page 122 [page 42 PDF] Moses Shipman history. Robinson's Ferry on the Brazos. Page 123 [page 43 PDF] Randal Jones and family. Thomas Barnett and family. Walter C. White. Page 124 [page 44 PDF] Wylie Martin and family. The Little's. Vince Family. Edward P. Whitehead. Steven Fuller Austin. James Franklin Perry and wife Emily. Page 126 [page 46 PDF] The cannon at Gonzales is mentioned although not described as the ' Come and take it' cannon.    [PDF]

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THE  SCANLAN  FAMILY

In 1853 Tim Scanlan arrived in Houston, Texas. By 1900 he was the richest man in town. Married only once [rumors are not true] he had 9 daughters. He became Mayor of Houston and was involved in several business ventures. None of his daughters ever married. The family story continues after his death until the last of his daughters died in January, 1950. [PDF]

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SIENNA PLANTATION CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT

The firm of Johnson Corporation contracted with Epesy, Hudson and Associates, Inc. to conduct an historical assement of the entire Sienna Plantation Development....  [PDF]

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T. W. HOUSE 2 ND SUGAR MILL

Arcola Plantation Second Sugar Mill Shown on the 1890 map Researched in the year 2011 by HRA Gray & Pape LLC. Overview.  [PDF]  Metal plate with Phoenix Ironworks of Houston [PDF]  Examples of bricks found  [PDF]  1 Floor plan before completed excavation  [PDF]  3 Floor plan cleaned up and used in the report  [PDF]

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SUGAR CANE CRUSHER STEAM ENGINE MADE IN 1861.

Here is an engineering description of a 'late model' steam engine made on the banks of  the Hudson River by an ironworks company located across the river from West Point Academy. Included in this report is  the history of the West Point Forge. [PDF]  This demonstration shows the steam engine operating.  [YOUTUBE WEB PAGE]

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THE SUGAR  LAND RAILROAD

The Sugar Land Railroad was funded in 1893. Eventually it was built in several directions from Sugar Land. The furthest point was at Anchor, Texas where it connected with the Velasco Railroad from Velasco [Freeport] and the International & Great Northern. Missouri Pacific eventually purchased the tracks from the Sugar Land Railroad and the International and Great Northern which allowed a daily run to Houston via Hawdon.   [PDF]

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BUFFALO  BAYOU,  BRAZOS  AND  COLORADO  RAILROAD

The first operating railroad in Texas was the Buffalo Bayou, Brazos & Colorado, completed from Harrisburg to Stafford in 1853. Later it became the the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway Company and ran from Houston to Missouri City, Stafford, Sugar Land, Sartartia [Walkers Station], Riddick, Harlem, Dorothy, Flora, Richmond, Rosenberg, Damon Junction, Randon, Wenzell, Tavner and on to Alleyton near Columbus. [PDF]

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THE INTERNATIONAL AND GREAT NORTHERN RAILROAD  and THE COLUMBIA TAP RAILROAD and THE BRAZORIA TAP RAILROAD  and THE HOUSTON TAP RAILROAD                                     

The International and Great Northern Railroad [I & GN RR] ran from Houston to Fresno, Arcola, Hawdon, Juliff and on to Angleton. Brazoria Tap RR, Columboa Tap RR and Houston Tap RR followed this route but were discontinued before the I & GN RR.  [PDF]

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THE DAMON JUNCTIN TO DAMOND MOUND RAILROAD

In 1918 the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio Railway built a twenty-one mile extension from Damon Junction to Damon Mound, connecting the local sulfur, limestone, and other mineral extraction industries with Rosenberg. [PDF]

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THE GULF, COLORADO AND SANTA FE RAILROAD

Gulf, Colorado & Santa Fe started building in 1873 and opened in 1879 from Richmond to Galveston. A direct route from Richmond to Galveston would be closer to Rosharon, so a more accurate description of the chosen route is from Richmond to Duke then Duke to Galveston. These early train engines were steam, steam comes from water, and Duke had the water from Clear Lake.  [PDF]

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SAN ANTONIO AND ARANSAS  PASS RAILROAD

The towns in Fort Bend County on this railroad are Simonton, Fulsher, Flewellen, Gaston and Clodne. The town that wanted the railroad but did not get it, and therefore disappeared was Pittsville.  [PDF]

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THE CANE BELT RAILROAD BUILT IN 1930.

The Cane Belt Railroad built a line from the Thompsons Switch community in 1930. It was soon purchased by Gulf Coast and Santa Fe Railroad [G C & S F RR] and ran south to Long Point, Guy, SENA JCT [Junction with Texas and New Orleans Railroad], Mooredale and on to Wharton County to the New Gulf sulphur plant at Bowling.  [PDF]

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TEXAS WESTERN RAILROAD

Texas Western Railroad was the only narrow gauge railroad attempted that touched  Fort Bend County. [PDF]

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THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JANE WILKINSON LONG

Jane Wilkinson Long, known as the mother of Texas   [PDF]

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THE CIVIL WAR EFFECTS ON FORT BEND COUNTY

Civil War affects on Fort Bend County during the war. [PDF]


HISTORY of FORT BEND COUNTY. by Wharton, Clarence, 1873-1941. Published 1950

[WEB SITE]


HISTORY of FORT BEND COUNTY, : containing biographical sketches of many noted characters by Sowell, A. J. 1848-1921. Published 1964  [WEB SITE]


History of the Old Fields' Home  ďWalnut PlantationĒ  [PDF]


 

THE EYES OF TEXAS 1977

This book was produced by a television station news department in Houston, Texas. This is their Gulf Coast Edition. The book contains many pictures of the 1970's, some of which cannot be taken today because of progress or natural distruction by the weather. Part 1  [PDF]

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BRAZOS RIVER MODIFICATIONS AND IMPROVEMENTS

This article with photos show the disadvantages and improvements to the Brazos River making the river an important asset. [PDF]


SUGAR LAND AND FORT BEND HISTORICAL PAPERS OF JANE GLAUNTER McMEANS

Sugar Land and Fort Bend historical papers of Jane McMeans, 1827-2003, MS #32, Woodson Research Center, Fondren Library, Rice University.

The Sugar Land and Fort Bend historical papers of Jane Glauner McMeans contain information about the Texas city of Sugar Land and about Fort Bend County. Sugar Land is on Oyster Creek and U.S. Highway 90A, east of the Brazos River and seven miles northeast of Richmond in northeastern Fort Bend County.   [THIS IS A LINK TO A WEB PAGE OF THE FONDREN LIBRARY, RICE UNIVERSITY. YOU MAY WANT TO GIVE 24 HOURS NOTICE PRIOR TO VISITING THE LIBRARY, TO ENSURE THE FILES HAVE BEEN PULLED AND MADE READY FOR YOU.]



Archives for Brazoria County History


THE MUNSONS OF TEXAS FAMILY HISTORY

Munsons-of-Texas.net is a website of the Munson's family history. Chapter nine is the starting point of their involvment in early Texas. The majority of their history in Texas was in Brazoria County. This family has owned a portion of Brazoria County at one time or another.  [WEB SITE]

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BRAZORIA COUNTY EARLY RESIDENTS

Early Brazoria County Towns and Residents; Brazoria, East Columbia, West Columbia, Josiah H Bell, Carry Nation, Col William G Hill, JohnAustin, John Adriance, George B McKinstry, Henry Smith, James Britton Bailey, Isacc T. Tinsley, James C Louis, Henry William Munson  [PDF]_________________________________________________________________________________

GEORGE S. PENTECOST, JACOB H. BANTONAND ROBERT G. SULLIVAN PLANTATION   By James Smith

George S. Pentecost-JoabH. Banton-Robert G. Salmon Plantation  [PDF]

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OSCEOLA PLANTATION    By James Smith

William Green Hill developed the Osceola Plantation from the James E. B. Austin 3 League tract on the west side of the Brazos above the town of Columbia 1849-1850    [PDF]

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CHENANGO PLANTATION    By James Smith

Benjamin Fort Smith moved to Brazoria County,Texas from Mississippi in 1832 and bought two tracts of land in the William Harris League east of Oyster Creek comprising ~1300 acres. Producing corn and cotton using African slaves he smuggled from Cuba he established Point Pleasant Plantation. The plantation became a way station for African slaves illegally brought from Cuba by the notorious slave smuggler Monroe Edwards who owned the plantation for a short period changing the name to Chenango according to tradition.   [PDF]

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GEORGE S. PENTECOST;  DANIEL H. YEISER;  JAMES W. DANCE;  PLANTATION   By James Smith

George S. Pentecost initially developed his farmfrom the upper quarter of the Samuel May Williams League on the east side of the San Bernard River along Mound Creek west of the town of Columbia buying the property in 1832. Monroe Edwards, the notorious African slave runner, acquired the property in 1836 as it adjoined his plantation in the Jesse Thompson League.    [PDF]

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DARRINGTON PLANTATION   By James Smith

In the northern part of Brazoria County, Texas lands from a major portion of the David Tally League were purchased to form the Darrington Plantation. Initially owned by David Tally, a member of Stephen F. Austinís Original 300 Families, acreage on the east side of the Brazos River along Oyster Creek was eventually acquired by Attorney John Darrington of  Clark County, Alabama. Though Darrington never came to Texas the plantation would forever assume his name.    [PDF]

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JOHN McNEEL PLANTATION;  ELLERSLIE PLANTATION;  JOHN GREENVILLE McNEEL;  JOHN MARION HUNNINGTON PLASANT GROVE PLANTATION;  LEANDER H. McNEEL SUGAR PLANTATION OF PLESANT D. McNEEL (MAGNOLIA)   By James Smith

John McNeel, one of Stephen F. Austinís Old Three Hundred colonists, moved to Texas from Arkansas in ~1822 with his wife, five sons, and two daughters settling in the Nacogdoches area. He and four of his sons received title to several leagues of land in the lower part of Brazoria in August 1824. The family initially settled on John McNeelís league located on the east side of the San Bernard River below the town of Brazoria.     [PDF]

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JOSIAH H. BELL;  THADDEUS C. & JAMES H BELL; JOHN W. BROOKS; WILLIAM ROSE PLANTATION   By James Smith

As a member of Stephen F. Austinís Original 300 Families Josiah H. Bell brought his family to Brazoria County in 1824 receiving 1Ĺ leagues of land on the west side of the Brazos River. At a point on the river which was navigable from the Gulf of Mexico he laid out the towns of Marion and Columbia. [PDF]

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JOSEPH MIMS-JAMES WALKER FANNIN;  JAMES  CALVIN McNEILL PLANTATION   By James Smith

One of Stephen F. Austinís Original 300 Families Joseph Mims and his second wife Sarah Weekley, of Alabama, came to Texas in ~1824 and settled on a league of land west of the town of Brazoria where they would raise a large family. Mims entered into a contract with James Walker Fannin Jr., an African slave trader, in January 1836 in which they would be equal partners in the Mims cotton plantation.   [PDF]

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JOSEPH REESE; CHARLES KELLER REESE; STEPHEN P. WINSTON; FOUNTAIN WINSTON; LAFAYETTE WINSTON;  ASA E. STRATTON WOODLAWN; PLANTATONS   By James Smith

John McCroskey received title to his one league of land in Brazoria County, Texas bordering on the east bank of Cedar Lake and west of the San Bernard River in 1824. It is doubtful that he ever did more than the minimum to obtain the property as his interests were in other parts of Stephen F. Austinís colony.    [PDF]

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OROZIMBO PLANTATION     By James Smith

Arriving on board the Lively in 1822 Doctor James Aeanas Enos Phelps was a member of Stephen F. Austinís original 300 colonists. He received title to a sitio or league of land on the west bank of the Brazos River above Bellís Landing (East Columbia) August 1824. In 1826 his household included his wife Rosetta Abilene Yerby, two sons, and two daughters. He continued to move his family back and forth to Mississippi where his first four children were born until~1832 establishing Orozimbo Plantation on his one league grant.   [PDF]

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RETRIVE PLANTATION   By James Smith

The Retrieve Plantation in Brazoria County, Texas began in the hopes and dreams of two enterprising often debt ridden men, Abner Jackson and James Hamilton. The name Retrieve was most probably selected by the desires of both men wanting to retrieve their lost fortunes in the new Republic of  Texas.  [PDF]


BYNUM  PLANTATION   By James Smith

Wade H. Bynum sold a 1000 acre cotton plantation out the Samuel Carter League east of the Brazos River in the Baileyís Prairie area to Robert and David G. Mills in October 1837. From Kentucky, the Mills brothers under the style of R. & D. G. Mills of Galveston, Texas would make this the nucleus for what would finally become a 3280 acre sugar plantation.   [PDF]


DURANZO PLANTATION   By James Smith  

Emily Austin Perry inherited a large portion of Stephen F. Austinís 7 1/3 League grant west of the Brazos River on gulf prairie after the death of her brother Stephen F. Austin in December 1836. In 1840 only six miles from the Gulf of Mexico William Joel Bryan established the Durazno Plantation[1] on a portion of this property.    [PDF]


ELI  MANADUE JUSTICE JOHN H. JONES PLANTATION   By James Smith

John H. Jones came to Brazoria County in the 1850ís from possibly the California gold rush. He initially bought 300 acres of land on Oyster Creek above Columbia in the John Bradley League in 1852 and started a cotton plantation. Through the 1850ís he bought additional tracts of land in the John Bradley and William T. Roberts Leagues until he owned well over 900 acres of land.   [PDF]


ALEXANDER JOHN W. COMPTON-LOUIS MARTIN STROBEL PLANTATION   By James Smith

The Alexander Compton Plantation located above the town of Columbia on the east of the Brazos River on the east side of Oyster Creek was formed from lands taken from John W. Hall League 11. Warren D. C. Hall who owned a major portion both 10 & 11 leagues after purchasing them from his brother John W. Hall sold ~830 acres from League 11 in November 1842 to Alexander Compton from Louisiana.    [PDF]


ISAAC  T.  TINLEY  WILLIAM  B.  ALDRIDGE   DT. ANTHONEY  T.  MORRIS  PLANTATION    By James Smith

Henry W. Johnson, Thomas Walker, and Thomas Henry Borden received title to one league of land west of the San Bernard River July 29, 1824. Thomas H. Borden became the principal owner of the league though he never actually tried to live on the property. October 1836, Borden sold 600 acres out of his league to Isaac Turner Tinsley. He moved to the property and built a cotton plantation. In 1841 Tinsley sold the plantation to William Burrell Aldridge of Virginia for $6000.     [PDF]


ANDREW ROBINSON LEAGUE    By James Smith

 Warren H. Manadue purchased two tracts of land above Columbia east of the Brazos River out of the Andrew Robinson league in 1846 and 1847 to build his cotton plantation and raise his family. In 1850 Warren H. Manadue died leaving his wife Ann E. Compton Manadue and at least two small children along with children from a previous marriage.   [PDF]


VELASCO FILES    By James Smith

            Captain Jeremiah Brown Residence, ca. 1838, Block 13, Lot 10   [PDF]

             Archer House- Herndon Beach Home, ca. 1838, Block 13, Lots 4, 5, 6, and 7   [PDF]

             Alexander Calvit-John H. Herndon Plantation   [PDF]             


VELASCO MERCHANT,  JOHN SHARP   By James Smith

According to Stephen F. Austinís Register of Families John Sharp, a single man from Scotland entered Texas in 1833.[1] John Sharp settled in Brazoria located on the west bank of the Brazos River about 18 miles from the Gulf of Mexico. There he went into the mercantile business with Davis R. Mims in the Exchange building. By October of 1834 the partnership of Mims & Sharp broke apart while Sharp continued the business.    [PDF]


BELL GROVE PLANTATION   By James Smith

Being a member of Stephen F. Austinís original 300 families, Thomas Westall brought his family from Tennessee in 1825 and settled near San Felipe de Austin. He made arrangements through Henry Austin to buy land in Brazoria County on the west side of the Brazos River in the lower part of the Stephen F. Austin 7 1/3 League and moved there ~1828, building a cotton plantation.   [PDF]


CHINA GROVE PLANTATION   By James Smith

Arriving in Texas in 1828 Warren D. C.  Hall with his wife would eventually settle on land in his brother John W. Hallís league 10 east of the Brazos River in the northern part of Brazoria County establishing China Grove plantation.   [PDF]


CEDAR BRAKE PLANTATION   By James Smith

In 1848 James H. Dance and his 1st cousin James Watkins Dance came to Texas on horseback from Alabama. They made several trips back home to persuade the rest of the family to move to Texas. By the later part of November 1850, according to the census, several males of the family were living with John Sweeney west of Columbia and probably preparing land and a home for the rest of the family:   [PDF]


HIRAM G. & HENRY "HAL" G. RUNNELS, PETER BERTRAND, THOMAS J. COFFEE, ARRON COFFEE, JAMES H. AND HARRISON TANKERSLEY PLANTATIONS   By James Smith

Andrew Robinson received 1 Ĺ leagues of land in Brazoria County east of the Brazos River and stretching across both sides of Oyster Creek, July 10, 1824, making him one of Stephen F. Austin original 300 families. Robinson maintained his residence in the northern part of Austinís colony and after the Texas Revolution sold out his holdings in Brazoria County. Peter G. Bertrand obtained acreage on the east side of Oyster Creek while Hal G. Runnels bought property on the west side of the creek.   [PDF]


THE JAIL BREAK OF OTTO COOPER AND CHARLES DELANEY

Some high points and an outline of story of the ďJail BreakĒ of Otto Cooper and Charles Delaney in Angleton, Texas, in September or October, 1909, follows, as from the memory of Joe Jamison, the writer.   [PDF]


THOMAS GILBERT MASTERSON-THOMAS WASHINGTON MASTERSON, EUREKA PLANTATION   By James Smith

Thomas G. Masterson was born in Knoxville, Tennessee December 16, 1812. His father, Thomas Masterson, had died shortly before his birth. His fatherís death left his wife Sarah Gray Washington, who was pregnant at the time, and their son William Washington Masterson. Thomas G. Masterson graduated from law school in Nashville, Tennessee. In 1832 he moved to Texas and became a merchant for a short time before returning to Tennessee. On July 3, 1834 Thomas G. Masterson married Christiana Irby Roane in Nashville, Tennessee. Thomas G. Masterson moved his family to the port of Velasco on the east side of the mouth of the Brazos River.   [PDF]


THOMAS PHILLIP CROSBY-THOMAS MURRAY CROSBY PLANTATION-CROSBY'S LANDING   By James Smith

Nine miles below Brazoria was an important plantation landing on the Brazos River. Thomas Phillips Crosby aged 26 years and his wife aged 20 years, the former Clementina Murray, lived in Philadelphia before moving to Texas in ~1830 along with their two children and an orphaned young man, Sidney Whitehead aged 18 years.   [PDF]


FRANCIS BINGHAM-JAMES P. BINGHAM, NEW BOWLING GREEN-PROVIDENCE PLANTATIONS.   By James Smith

Francis Bingham came to Texas from Monroe, Perry County, Mississippi ~ 1823 and became one of Stephen F. Austinís original three hundred. Returning to the United States to take care of his business affairs in 1824, he did not bring his family to Texas until the later part of 1827 to establish his New Bowling Green plantation east of the Brazos in what is now the northern part of Brazoria County.    [PDF]


RICHMOND CHAMPION PLANTATION   By James Smith

Preferring to settle at the mouth of the Brazos River after Asa Mitchell had received his league of land May 7, 1824 he sold it to his brother Eli Mitchell. Eli Mitchell sold the ľ league which was in the lower part of the upper half of the league to Edwin Waller in 1836. Edwin Waller would make this his homestead.   [PDF]


Daniel B. McNeel/Dr. Elias Stephens/Hennell Stevens Cedar Grove Plantation   By James Smirh

Daniel McNeel, born on an island off Scotland, was one of Stephen F. Austinís original 300 colonists.He petitioned Stephen F. Austin for a league of land and received that league west of the San Bernard River near Columbia August 3, 1824. He brought his wife Mary H. McNeel and their children to Texas before 1826.     [PDF]


Durango Plantation or Copes Place   By James Smith   

Dr. James Wilson Copes established Durango Plantation after returning to Brazoria County after 1848. The plantation was carved out of land his wife Elizabeth Lucinda Bell would receive as part of her inheritance from the estate of her father Josiah H. Bell.    [PDF]


Brazoria County Cemeteries   [PDF]



 

 

Archives for Texas as Republic [April 21, 1836 to December 29, 1845]

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HOW DID THE TEXANS WIN INDEPENDENCE ?

Names of battles and their outcomes on the way to victory. [PDF]

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TEXAS HISTORY TIMELINE

Key Events in Early Texas [PDF]

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CLASS DESIGNATIONS FOR SETTLERS IN THE REPUBLIC OF TEXAS

During the period of the Republic of Texas, the Texas government granted over 50 million acres of public land to attract new settlers. The amount of land and the conditions of the grants were based primarily on the settler's "class", which was determined by their date of arrival in Texas.  [PDF]

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DISTANCE AND AREA MEASUREMENTS USED IN EARLY TEXAS.

Land measurements used in early Texas were based on the Spanish system of the period. They were keyed to two primary units of distance: a vara and a league. [PDF]

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COMPROMISE OF 9 TH OF SEPTEMBER, 1850.

During its early years of statehood, Texas claimed territory about fifty percent larger than its present boundary, including parts of the present states of New Mexico, Oklahoma, Kansas, Colorado and Wyoming. [PDF]

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 The Shape of the Republic of Texas as it would appear on a modern map of the United States, [Compliments of Bruce Grethen, member of the Fort Bend County Historical Commission in the year 2015] [PDF]


TEXAS AS A NATION  1836 TO 1845

In the fall of 1835 many Texans, both Anglo-American colonists and Tejanos, concluded that liberalism and republicanism in Mexico, as reflected in its Constitution of 1824, were dead. The dictatorship of President Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna, supported by rich landowners, had seized control of the governments and subverted the constitution. As dissension and discord mounted in Texas, both on the military front and at the seat of the provisional government of the Consultation at San Felipe, the colonists agreed that another popular assembly was needed to chart a course of action.   [PDF]


TEXAS 1840 [A BOOK BY GEORGE W. BONNELL]

Published in AUSTIN, TEXAS by Clark, Wing and Brown. 1840. Includes an account of the Indian tribes.  [PDF]

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SKETCHES-OF-TEXAS-1840 [A BOOK BY FISHER]

The writer takes pleasure in presenting before the public the following favorable notice of his work, by Rev. P. Ackeres, well known in the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Rev. Dr. McNeill, of this city: Having examined Rev. O. Fisher's "Sketches Of Texas," we take pleasure in recommending it to the public generally, and to anyone who may wish to emigrate to that interesting part of the world in particular, as a very useful and constructive manual concerning that rising republic. P. AKERS,   FRANCIS  A. McNEILL  Springfield, Ill. Jan 18, 1841. [PDF]

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TEXAS 1841 [A BOOK BY AUTHOR IKIN, TEXIAN CONSUL]

Designed for the use of the British Merchant and as a guide to emigrants. [PDF]

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1845 TEXAS [A BOOK BY RICHARD S. HUNT AND JESSE F. RANDEL- HOUSTON, TEXAS ]

A new guide to Texas.  [PDF]

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  A HISTORY of TEXAS and TEXANS, by Frank W. Johnson. Ed. and brought to date by Eugene C. Barker with the assistance of Ernest William Winkler. To which are added historical, statistical and descriptive matter pertaining to the important local divisions of the State, and biographical accounts of the leaders and representative men of the state.  

 [WEB SITE]


A GAZETTER of TEXAS, by Henry Gannett. . Gannett, Henry, 1846-1914.

[WEB SITE]



 

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